An introduction to aids acquired immune deficiency syndrome

It is also defined by numerous opportunistic infections and cancers that occur in the presence of HIV infection.

An introduction to aids acquired immune deficiency syndrome

It is the virus that causes AIDS. Over time, infection with HIV can weaken the immune system to the point that the system has difficulty fighting off certain infections.

These types of infections are known as opportunistic infections. These infections are usually controlled by a healthy immune system, but they can cause problems or even be life-threatening in someone with AIDS. A blood test can determine if a person is infected with HIV.

In the United States, nearly 1. Getting tested is the first step to finding out if you have HIV. If you have HIV, getting medical care and taking medicines regularly helps you live a longer, healthier life and also lowers the chances of passing HIV on to others. There are many theories about the origin of HIV.

The first known case was found in a blood sample collected from man from Kinshasha, Democratic Republic of Congo in Genetic analysis of this blood suggests that the origin of HIV came from a single strain of HIV-1 in the s or s.

Symptoms of rare types of what are now known as opportunistic infections began manifesting themselves between HIV was first isolated by scientists in This name was later changed to HIV human immunodeficiency virus.

A diagnosis of AIDS acquired immune deficiency syndrome is made by a physician. What are the symptoms of HIV?

NASP Center: HIV/AIDS - What Educators Should Know

Most people infected with HIV do not know that they have become infected, because they do not feel ill immediately after infection. However, some people do experience a illness with fever, rash, joint pains and enlarged lymph nodes.

A person with HIV may look healthy and feel good, but they can still pass the virus to you, especially during the initial infection period. You cannot tell if someone has HIV by just looking at them.

HIV infects cells of the human immune system and destroys or impairs their function. Once a person with HIV develops any one of a number of rare infections or cancers — tuberculosis, pneumonia, candidiases or tumors — they are said to have AIDS.

This most often occurs years after a person becomes infected with HIV. Sincethe introduction of powerful anti-retroviral therapies has dramatically changed the progression time between HIV infection and the development of AIDS. There are also other medical treatments that can prevent or cure some of the illnesses associated with AIDS, though the treatments do not cure AIDS itself.

Because of these advances in drug therapies and other medical treatments, estimates of how many people will develop AIDS and how soon are being recalculated, revised, or are currently under study.

Who does HIV affect? There are various risk factors that make some people more at risk for contracting HIV than others.

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Most people, however, run some risk of contracting HIV as they share in one or more of the following risk factors: Unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex Early age of first sexual activity—It is common for youth to engage in sexual activity before receiving information about HIV prevention Heterosexual sex—Women and minorities are particularly vulnerable to HIV infection Men who have Sex with Men MSM —Stigma and discrimination make it more difficult for MSM to access testing and counseling services Sexually transmitted infection STIs —The presence of other STIs can greatly increase the likelihood of HIV transmission Unprotected vaginal, anal, or oral sex Exchange sex for money Substance abuse—Chronic and intermittent substance users are more likely to engage in high-risk behaviors while using.

Injection drug users also run the risk of being infected by HIV while sharing unclean needles. For many people poverty prevents access to quality health care.

Out-of-school youth—Those that drop out of school are more likely to become sexually active younger and less likely to use condoms and other types of contraception. How safe is the U. Infection through blood transfusion and other blood products is rare.

According to the CDC, an estimated 1 into 1 indonations per year are infectious for HIV but are not detected by current antibody screening tests. As technology advances, the blood supply will become even safer. How is HIV transmitted?Headache: Introduction.

Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a spectrum of conditions caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following initial infection, a person may not notice any symptoms or may experience a Treatment: Antiretroviral therapy. Managing HIV/AIDS in the workplace A Guide for Government Departments Department of Public Service and Administration 3 To give effect to this policy framework I have, on 21 June The Immune System - One of the most important systems in the body of any species is the immune system. The immune system is a biological response that protects the body from dangerous pathogens that can cause harm or even death to the body.

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brain injury. AIDS is caused by a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which originated in non-human primates in Central and West leslutinsduphoenix.com various sub-groups of the virus acquired human infectivity at different times, the global pandemic had its origins in the emergence of one specific strain – HIV-1 subgroup M – in Léopoldville in the Belgian Congo (now Kinshasa in the Democratic Republic of the.

AIDS: AIDS (acquired immunodeficiency syndrome), transmissible disease of the immune system caused by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). HIV slowly attacks and destroys the immune system, leaving an individual vulnerable to a variety of other infections and certain malignancies that eventually cause death.

"HIV stands for 'human immunodeficiency virus'. HIV is a retrovirus that infects cells of the human immune system (mainly CD4 positive T cells and macrophages (key components of the cellular immune system), and destroys or impairs their function.

An introduction to aids acquired immune deficiency syndrome

Human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) is a spectrum of conditions caused by infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Following initial infection, a person may not notice any symptoms or may experience a Symptoms: Early: flu like illness, Later: Large lymph nodes, fever, weight loss.

An introduction to aids acquired immune deficiency syndrome

AIDS is an immunodeficiency disorder. Lymphocytes (white blood cells) are one of the main types of immune cells that make up the immune system. There are two types of lymphocytes: B cells and T cells.

AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) | University of Maryland School of Medicine